URGENT: Four Mexican gray wolves caught in leg traps in New Mexico. Many more leg hold traps, snares and poisons are found across the New Mexico landscape.

Will you chip in right now to help provide the resources we need to fight for these wolves – in the field, in court, and in Washington, D.C.?

Craig Miller

Senior Representative Arizona
520-623-9653
cmiller@defenders.org

Craig MillerAreas of Expertise: Southwest conservation issues, species recovery, landowner relations and incentives, predator-livestock conflicts, bi-national collaboration 

Craig is Defenders’ Senior Southwest Representative and has led Defenders’ regional wolf and jaguar conservation programs since 1993. He has served on the federal recovery teams for the cactus-ferruginous pygmy-owl and the gray wolf and currently serves on the executive committee of the Grand Canyon Wolf Recovery Project. He is also co-founder and active board member of Northern Jaguar Project, a binational collaborative effort to conserve jaguars throughout their northern range and he currently serves as a conservation fellow of the Rewilding Institute. Craig has been active in Southwest conservation issues since 1987.

Prior to joining Defenders, Craig conducted forest inventories for Southwest Environmental Consultants and worked as an outdoor adventure guide and naturalist. Throughout this period he has also volunteered as a wilderness study area adopter for the Arizona Wilderness Coalition, as a wolf advocate through Preserve Arizona’s Wolves (PAWS), and as a board member of the Arizona League of Conservation Voters.

Craig received his B.S. in Public Administration/Natural Resources at Northern Arizona University and is an alumnus of Lesley College Graduate School and the National Audubon Society Expedition Institute.

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