Craig Miller

Senior Southwest Representative
520-623-9653
cmiller@defenders.org

Craig MillerAreas of Expertise: Southwest conservation issues, species recovery, landowner relations and incentives, predator-livestock conflicts, bi-national collaboration 

Craig is Defenders’ Senior Southwest Representative and has led Defenders’ regional wolf and jaguar conservation programs since 1993. He has served on the federal recovery teams for the cactus-ferruginous pygmy-owl and the gray wolf and currently serves on the executive committee of the Grand Canyon Wolf Recovery Project. He is also co-founder and active board member of Northern Jaguar Project, a binational collaborative effort to conserve jaguars throughout their northern range and he currently serves as a conservation fellow of the Rewilding Institute. Craig has been active in Southwest conservation issues since 1987.

Prior to joining Defenders, Craig conducted forest inventories for Southwest Environmental Consultants and worked as an outdoor adventure guide and naturalist. Throughout this period he has also volunteered as a wilderness study area adopter for the Arizona Wilderness Coalition, as a wolf advocate through Preserve Arizona’s Wolves (PAWS), and as a board member of the Arizona League of Conservation Voters.

Craig received his B.S. in Public Administration/Natural Resources at Northern Arizona University and is an alumnus of Lesley College Graduate School and the National Audubon Society Expedition Institute.

You may also be interested in:

California Condor
Fact Sheet
The California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) is the largest terrestrial bird in North America. It is black in color and sports a bald head with very few feathers.
Desert Tortoise
Fact Sheet
The desert tortoise is a large herbivore and the official reptile in the states of California and Nevada. No other tortoise in North America shares the extreme conditions of habitats occupied by the desert tortoise.
Peregrine Falcon, Dawn Key/iStock
Fact Sheet
Peregrine falcons are the fastest-flying birds in the world – they are able to dive at 200 miles per hour.