Earth Day Match Extended! ur Board of Directors and President's Circle members were so impressed by the support we received, they've offered up an extra $50,000 in funds to match any donations made through April 30th 2-for-1 up to a total of $200,000!

Please give today, while your generous donation will make triple the impact in saving wildlife.

Got Grizzlies?

Got Grizzlies? Poster

The primary factor limiting grizzly bear recovery is human-caused mortality. Bears die when they get into trouble with people’s garbage, livestock, when they are hit by cars and trains or illegally killed. By preventing these conflicts we help both people and bears.

Click the image to download a poster for the electric fencing incentive program to help us promote this program.

Electric Fence Incentive Form

Defenders of Wildlife will reimburse 50% of the cost of an electric fence (up to $500) for securing grizzly bear attractants, such as garbage, fruit trees and livestock, in eligible counties in Washington, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.

Application and brochure for 2019 projects now available.

Defenders of Wildlife Grizzly Bear Electric Fence Incentive Program

This instructional video walks you through the basics of how to build a bear-resistant electric fence. Properly installed bear-resistant electric fencing is a simple and effective way to protect the attractants found in your backyard and reduce conflicts with bears and other wildlife. 

 

Erin Edge, Defenders’ Representative for Rockies and Plains, talks about Defenders’ work to reduce conflict between bears and people, including the Electric Fencing Program:

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Conservation Issue
In the Magazine
The America’s Wildlife Heritage Act aims to ensure that the government manages national forests and other public lands by making the health of ecosystems a priority.
In the Magazine
In the race to save bats affected by the deadly white-nose syndrome, scientists from Michigan Technological University are using chemical “fingerprinting” to identify where bats hung out the previous summer.