For Immediate Release
Santa Fe, NM

To better protect aquatic and riparian species in New Mexico, Defenders of Wildlife has been awarded a grant from the New Mexico’s Department of Game and Fish’s Share with Wildlife program. The purpose of the grant is to gather data in order to identify infrastructure projects and roadways in the northern Jemez Mountains that could be upgraded or redesigned to more effectively maintain connectivity for imperiled aquatic species including the Rio Grande chub, Rio Grande sucker, Rio Grande leopard frog and boreal chorus frog. 

Statement from Michael Dax, New Mexico Representative: 

“It is critical to make infrastructure improvements in New Mexico to protect the passage of aquatic and riparian species. We are pleased to partner with New Mexico Game and Fish to study how wildlife in the Jemez Mountains like the Rio Grande sucker and Northern leopard frog are impacted by roads, bridges and dams but also drought and warming temperatures.” 

Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With over 1.8 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit defenders.org/newsroom and follow us on Twitter @Defenders.

Media Contact

Rebecca Bullis
Rebecca Bullis
Communications Associate
rbullis@defenders.org
(202) 772-0295

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