“We are saddened the state resorted to killing one of these newly discovered wolves. What’s especially crushing is that this tragedy could have been prevented if adequate range riding had been in place. It is not necessary to kill wolves to stop depredations.”

Zoë Hanley, Northwest representative with Defenders of Wildlife
Columbia County, WA

Today, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced it shot and killed a wolf in Columbia County, Washington. The wolf was one of several adults and pups establishing new territory north of the Touchet pack and west of the Tucannon pack. 

“We are saddened the state resorted to killing one of these newly discovered wolves,” said Zoë Hanley, northwest representative with Defenders of Wildlife. “What’s especially crushing is that this tragedy could have been prevented if adequate range riding had been in place. It is not necessary to kill wolves to stop depredations.” 

The wolves had injured four calves and killed two others this year prior to being killed. One more wolf can still be killed under the lethal removal permits issued by the state. 

“We’ll continue to work with WDFW and be a resource for local ranchers to promote proactive nonlethal methods that prioritize coexistence over killing wolves,” said Hanley.

This marks the first wolf killed in Washington this year. The  state authorized lethal removal of the Togo pack in northeastern Washington in August 2022, however, depredations ceased following the lethal order and no wolves were killed.
 

Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With nearly 2.2 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit defenders.org/newsroom and follow us on Twitter @Defenders.

Media Contact

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Hawk Hammer headshot
Hawk Hammer
Communications Specialist
hhammer@defenders.org
(202) 772-0295
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Zoë Hanley
Zoë Hanley
Northwest Representative

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