Bryan Bird

Director Southwest Program
(505) 501-4488

Areas of Expertise: Mexican gray wolf, the Southern Rockies and Sky Islands focal landscapes, conservation biology and public lands protection, habitat connectivity, ecosystem restoration and ecosystem services.

Bryan BirdBryan Bird joined Defenders in 2016 and directs Defenders' efforts to protect imperiled wildlife and their habitats in the Southwest. He is building on the highly effective work of our Arizona team throughout the region and expanding our work in New Mexico which is home to sensitive habitats and many endangered species.  Bryan comes to Defenders with over 20 years of experience protecting and restoring public lands while preserving wilderness and biodiversity across the Southwest and northern Mexico. Bryan has expertise in conservation of forests, riparian ecosystems and rare species habitats. He served by appointment of the Secretary of Agriculture on the Collaborative Forest Restoration Program (CFRP) Technical Advisory Panel that advised the Secretary on funding priorities and restoration of fire -dependent ecosystems. Bryan has worked to restore Mexican gray wolves in the Greater Gila Bioregion of New Mexico and Arizona for over a decade. He has published reports on western wildfire policy and beaver reestablishment as a tool for climate adaptation. 

Bryan holds a M.S. in Biology from New Mexico State University and a B.S. in Biology, from the University of Colorado, Boulder. 

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