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© Sam Parks

Promoting Coexistence

Overview

Americans are fortunate to have an impressive diversity of wildlife sharing the land, water, and sky with us. But as people have moved into undeveloped areas, and climate change has caused wildlife habitat to shift, conflicts with wild animals have increased.

Often, when wild animals are seen as a threat or a nuisance, they are simply killed. This approach has led to the decline of species in the past – particularly large native predators like wolves and bears who play critical roles in creating healthier ecosystems that benefit us all. Finding ways to prevent conflicts without lethal control is in the best interest of wildlife and humans alike.

Our experts have years of experience and promoting and implementing effective nonlethal coexistence tools and strategies. We help individuals, communities, and state and local agencies implement nonlethal measures that allow them to coexist peacefully with native wildlife.

 

To honor our incredible wildlife, Defenders has declared 2019 the Year of Coexistence. Over the course of the year, we'll highlight innovative ways people are sharing the landscape with wildlife.

defenders.org/coexistence

You may also be interested in:

Defenders in Action
Bears die when they get into trouble with people’s garbage, livestock, when they are hit by cars and trains or illegally killed. By preventing these conflicts we can keep bears alive and on the road to recovery.
In the Magazine
Along Highway 160 in southwestern Colorado, the movement of deer and elk mark the changing seasons.
In the Magazine
Manatees are no strangers to hardship—and so far this year they’ve gotten no breaks.