For Immediate Release

WASHINGTON (Aug. 7, 2017) -- The Department of the Interior issued new direction to federal agencies today to revise current federal sage-grouse conservation plans to allow for more fossil fuel development, livestock grazing and other land uses that could negatively affect the grouse and hundreds of other species in the Sagebrush Sea.

Jamie Rappaport Clark, President and CEO for Defenders of Wildlife, issued the following statement:

“Interior’s proposed changes could irreparably damage sage-grouse habitat, jeopardizing an unprecedented, collaborative effort to conserve this iconic species.”

“While the Trump administration works to weaken the federal sage-grouse conservation plans, scientists recommend doing quite the opposite. The latest research advises strengthening conservation measures to protect and restore sage-grouse, which also benefits hundreds of other wildlife species, sagebrush grasslands and the Western communities and economies that depend on them.”

For over 75 years, Defenders of Wildlife has remained dedicated to protecting all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With a nationwide network of nearly 2.1 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife for generations to come. To learn more, please visit https://defenders.org/newsroom or follow us on X @Defenders.

  

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