Raleigh, NC

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced that they will transfer three critically-endangered red wolves to the Red Wolf Recovery Area in eastern North Carolina. Two adult male wolves will be transferred from St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge in Florida to North Carolina’s Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, and a third adult male wolf will transfer from Alligator River to nearby Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. In all three cases, the USFWS will pair the male wolves with female wolves in order to promote mating. The red wolf is the most endangered wolf species in the United States, having lost 99.7% of its historic range. Only 11 known red wolves remain in the wild, primarily in the Albemarle Peninsula.

Heather Clarkson, Southeast program outreach representative at Defenders of Wildlife, issued the following statement: 

“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is taking an important step to help the red wolf survive in the wild, but it is not enough to sustain the population. Until the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service begins allowing the release of captive pups into wild litters, the species will merely remain on life support.” 

Additional Background 

  • Following the transfer, the male wolves will be kept in pens with their prospective mates under observation for one month to build a connection between the pairs. 
  • In 2019, no wild red wolf litters were born—the first time since the Red Wolf Recovery Program began.

Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With over 1.8 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit defenders.org/newsroom and follow us on Twitter @Defenders.

Media Contact

Jake Bleich headshot
Jake Bleich
Communications Associate
jbleich@defenders.org
(202) 772-3208

Related

News

Washington, DC

Oil and Polar Bears Don’t Mix: Trump Administration Asks Public to Review Peer-reviewed Polar Bear Study

On Tuesday, February 18, the Trump administration will open an unprecedented 60-day comment period asking the public to comment on a study authored by its own scientists at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) entitled “Seismic survey design and potential impacts to maternal polar bear dens.” The study is intended to support decision making on potential fossil fuel development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, though such research is not typically offered for public comment.
Washington, DC

Commonwealth of Virginia Announces Steps Towards Protecting Migratory Birds

The commonwealth of Virginia announced today that it will take actions to ensure the protection of migratory birds in the face of the Trump administration’s abandonment of enforcement of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). The state announced that the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (DGIF) will begin a process to promulgate state-wide regulations to establish a permitting process to minimize the incidental take of migratory birds by commercial, industrial and construction projects.