For Immediate Release
Washington, DC

Today the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service cut back the critical habitat for the northern spotted owl throughout Washington and California. This decision, released in a final rule, opens up more than 3 million acres of protected old-growth forest for logging, permanently eliminating habitat for this threatened bird, which has been sliding toward extinction for decades.

Jamie Rappaport Clark, president and CEO of Defenders of Wildlife, issued this statement:

“At every turn, the Trump administration is undercutting the northern spotted owl’s chances of survival. Despite scientific evidence showing that this owl is endangered, the agency refuses to increase protections for the beleaguered bird. Today, the administration finalized a proposal to eliminate nearly 3.5 million acres of the owl’s critical habitat increasing the likelihood of logging in the old growth forests they call home. Time and again, the Trump administration exacerbates the threats that will only increase the likelihood of extinction for this beleaguered bird.”

Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With nearly 2.2 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit defenders.org/newsroom and follow us on Twitter @Defenders.

Related

Image
Burrowing Owls

News

Image
Manatee resting at Three Sisters Springs

Tampa Bay’s Catastrophic Red Tide Could Preview Florida’s Future

A large outbreak of highly toxic algae or “red tide” continues to impact Gulf Coast communities in Southwest Florida, resulting in the deaths of over 1,500 tons of marine life and fish, including manatees, goliath groupers, dolphins and endangered sea turtles along St. Petersburg and Pinellas County beaches.
Image
Eastern Bluebird
Washington, DC

Congress Calls for Lasting Protections for Migratory Birds

Today, Representative Alan Lowenthal (D-CA) joined with Representative Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA) and 47 original co-sponsors to introduce the Migratory Bird Protection Act to reaffirm long-standing protections for migratory birds against industrial take — that is, unintentional but predictable killing of birds.