“By listing all glass frogs on Appendix II, we can help alleviate the pressure from unregulated and illegal international trade and give these incredible amphibians a chance. We are thrilled the global community has recognized the importance of moving this proposal forward and the fact that it was done by consensus makes it even more special.”

Alejandra Goyenechea, senior international counsel for Defenders of Wildlife.
PANAMA CITY, Panama

Today, in a late-night session the proposal to list all 158 species of glass frogs under Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was adopted by consensus after the European Union decided it would not block the proposal in the face of overwhelming support. The proposal was led by 14 countries, including the host country Panama, Costa Rica, and the U.S.

“The decks have been stacked against glass frogs and they are paying the price,” said Alejandra Goyenechea, senior international counsel for Defenders of Wildlife, who has worked on this proposal for years. “By listing all glass frogs on Appendix II, we can help alleviate the pressure from unregulated and illegal international trade and give these incredible amphibians a chance. We are thrilled the global community has recognized the importance of moving this proposal forward and the fact that it was done by consensus makes it even more special.” 

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Emerald Glass Frog on Branch - Costa Rica
Christopher Cote

Glass frogs are increasingly threatened by the international pet trade, disease, invasive species and widespread habitat loss. They are endemic to the south of Mexico down to South America, and more than half of glass frog species evaluated by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) are threatened with extinction. A grim 71 percent of glass frog species are declining in the wild. 

Leading up to the conference, it was unclear if the proposal had the support it needed, especially after the European Union (EU) Commission indicated that it would not be backing it. 

The proposal to list the glass frog was narrowly defeated at the previous Conference of the Parties when it only failed to be adopted by two votes. The proposal is not final until confirmed at the close of the conference in plenary. 

Background

Defenders of Wildlife is celebrating 75 years of protecting all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With a nationwide network of nearly 2.2 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit defenders.org/newsroom and follow us on Twitter @Defenders.

Media Contact

Communications Specialist
hhammer@defenders.org
(202) 772-0295
Senior International Counsel
agoyenechea@defenders.org

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