URGENT: Four Mexican gray wolves caught in leg traps in New Mexico. Many more leg hold traps, snares and poisons are found across the New Mexico landscape.

Will you chip in right now to help provide the resources we need to fight for these wolves – in the field, in court, and in Washington, D.C.?

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© Julie Chen

Defenders in the Southwest

Defenders in Action: Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery

The Mexican gray wolf, or lobo,  is one of the most endangered mammals in the United States. In 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) released its most recent count of these iconic animals. The number of wild Mexican gray wolves is too small and their future remains highly uncertain.

How We’re Helping

  • Defenders works with expert scientists to find the best path forward for endangered lobos to recover and thrive, and then advocates for these science-based solutions.
  • We work with ranchers throughout the Southwest, using range riders, fladry, alternative pastures, community calving and other proven techniques to reduce conflicts between wolves and livestock. We also play a lead role on the Meixcan Wolf/Livestock Coexistence Council, which developed and is implementing an innovative program of incentives for ranching in harmony with wolves.
  • Defenders continues our partnership with the White Mountain Apache Tribe. Working with the tribe, we helped to develop an eco-tour focused on Mexican gray wolves and traditional tribal culture. We also work with tribal livestock associations to reduce conflicts with wolves, and with tribal businesses to create opportunities tied to wolf recovery. 
  • Our office hosts many activities to increase awareness of the plight of Mexican wolves, from public lectures to art exhibits, films, occasional field activities and opportunities to join with other wolf activists to take action for wolves at public hearings, rallies and workshops.

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